Fruits & Veggies that Stay Fresh

One of the biggest drawbacks of buying fresh fruits and veggies is that they go bad so fast. Fall behind on your cooking and a nasty surprise is sure to be waiting in the crisper drawer. Building meals and snacks around longer-lasting produce gives you more leeway — and saves you cash.

Note that there’s a Catch 22 when it comes to storing and eating produce, especially fruit. While most fruit lasts longer in the fridge, you’re more likely to eat it if it’s in a bowl on your kitchen counter. Consider putting out a few pieces of fruit each morning (not more than you can eat in two days) and keeping the rest cold.

Ok, now on to our list! While results are bound to vary, the items below will generally retain peak flavor and texture for at least a week after being purchased ripe.


Everlasting Vegetables

Fresh up to 3 months in the pantry:

Acorn squash
Butternut squash
Delicata squash
Spaghetti squash

Fresh up to 1 month:

Garlic (pantry)
Onions (pantry)
Parsnips (fridge)
Shallots (pantry)
Tomatillos (fridge)

Fresh up to 3 weeks in the fridge:

Beets

Fresh up to 2 weeks:

Cabbage, green and red (fridge)
Carrots (fridge)
Celery (fridge)
Chili peppers, fresh (fridge)
Lettuce, iceberg (fridge)
Radishes (fridge)
Rutabaga (fridge)
Sweet potatoes and yams (pantry)
Turnips (fridge)

Fresh up to 1 week in the fridge:

Artichokes
Bell peppers, green
Broccoli
Broccoli rabe
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage (napa and savoy)
Cauliflower
Fennel
Green beans
Jicama
Leeks
Lettuce (other than iceberg)
Mushrooms
Rhubarb


Fruit that Won’t Fade Fast

Fresh for up to 2 weeks in the fridge:

Apples
Grapefruit
Lemons
Limes
Pomegranates

Fresh for up to 1 week in the fridge:

Blueberries
Oranges
Tangerines
Watermelon


Endurance Herbs

Fresh for up to 2 weeks in the fridge:

Rosemary
Thyme

 

6 Keep-It-Fresh Tips:

1. Store fruits and veggies whole to keep them fresher longer.
2. Wait to wash produce until you’re ready to prep it. Excess moisture breeds mold.
3. Examine berries, grapes, etc. when you get them home. Toss any bad ones and store in a ventilated container like a small colander.
4. Pick browned or wilted leaves off of lettuce, spinach, and other greens before storing in a plastic bag in the fridge. Add a paper towel to the bag to absorb moisture.
5. Heed expiration dates on leafy greens – bacteria can grow even if they look ok.
6. Store mushrooms in a brown paper bag in the fridge.